VIDEO-President Obama's Plan to Fight Climate Change | The White House

Reducing Carbon Pollution from Power Plants

Power plants are the largest major source of emissions in the U.S., together accounting for roughly one-third of all domestic greenhouse gas pollution.

 

PROGRESS:

In August 2015, President Obama and EPA established the Clean Power Plan — the first-ever carbon pollution standards for existing power plants, which will protect the health of our children and put us on a path toward a 32 percent reduction in carbon pollution by 2030.

Expanding the Clean Energy Economy

Since the President took office, the administration has made the largest investment in clean energy in American history. The Clean Power Plan will lead to 30% more renewable energy generation in 2030.

 

PROGRESS:

Since President Obama took office, the U.S. has increased solar generation by more than twenty-fold and tripled electricity production from wind power.

 

PROGRESS:

Since the President took office, the Department of the Interior has permitted over 50 wind, solar, and geothermal utility-scale projects on public or tribal lands. The projects could support over 20,000 jobs and generate enough electricity to power 4.8 million homes.

 

PROGRESS:

President Obama has created a new initiative to increase access to solar energy for low- and moderate-income households, and to build a more inclusive workforce.

 

PROGRESS:

Building on our progress in wind and solar, the Administration secured more than $4 billion in private sector commitments and actions to scale up clean energy innovation and technologies that reduce carbon pollution.

Continuing the momentum for the future:

To ensure America's continued leadership position in clean energy, President Obama has set new goals.

2015

President Obama's Fiscal Year 2015 Budget continues to further American leadership by investing approximately $6.9 billion in funding for clean energy technology programs. This includes investment in a range of energy technologies, from advanced biofuels and emerging nuclear technologies to clean coal. 

2020

To ensure America's continued leadership position in clean energy. President Obama has set a goal to double wind and solar electricity generation once again by 2020.

2020

Federal agencies are setting a new goal of reaching 100MW of installed renewable capacity across federally-subsidized housing stock by 2020. 

2025

The Department of Defense — the single largest consumer of energy in the United States — is committed to deploying three gigawatts of renewable energy on military installations by 2025.

Building Clean Energy Infrastructure

Heavy-duty vehicles (commercial trucks, vans, and buses) are currently the second largest source of greenhouse gas pollution within the transportation sector.

 

PROGRESS:

In January 2014, President Obama signed a Presidential Memorandum establishing the federal government’s first Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) process, with an initial focus on our nation's energy infrastructure.

 

PROGRESS:

In February 2014, President Obama directed EPA and DOT to develop and issue the next phase of heavy-duty vehicle fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas standards. The standards are proposed in March 2015 and finalized in March 2016.

 

PROGRESS:

In 2011, the Administration finalized fuel economy standards for Model Year 2014-2018 for heavy-duty trucks, buses, and vans. This will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 270 million metric tons and save 530 million barrels of oil.

 

PROGRESS:

The Administration has already established the toughest fuel economy standards for passenger vehicles in U.S. history. These standards require an average performance equivalent of 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025.

Continuing the momentum for the future:

During the President's second term, the Administration is partnering with industry leaders and other key stakeholders.

Post-2018

In partnership with industry leaders and other key stakeholders, the Administration will develop post-2018 fuel economy standards for heavy-duty vehicles to further reduce consumption through the application of advanced cost-effective technologies.

 

The Administration will also support the Renewable Fuel Standard and invest in research and development to help bring next-generation biofuels on line.

Cutting energy waste in homes, businesses, and factories

Energy efficiency is one of the clearest and most cost-effective opportunities to save families money, make our businesses more competitive, and reduce greenhouse gas pollution.

 

PROGRESS:

The President’s Better Buildings Challenge, enlisted more than 250 partners in cities, states, utilities, manufacturers, school districts, and businesses to improve energy efficiency. Since the program’s launch in 2011, partners have saved 94 trillion units of energy and $840 million.

 

PROGRESS:

In President Obama's first term, DOE and HUD completed efficiency upgrades in nearly two million homes, saving many families more than $400 on their heating and cooling bills in the first year alone.

 

PROGRESS:

In December 2013, the Department of Agriculture announced it will provide up to $250 million to help businesses and residential customers in rural areas cut their energy bills through energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

 

PROGRESS:

In 2014, DOE issued nine proposed and 10 final energy conservation standards for appliances and equipment. If finalized and combined with rules already issued, the energy savings will help cut consumers' electricity bills by hundreds of billions of dollars.

Continuing the momentum for the future:

The Administration will continue to take a range of new steps geared toward cutting energy waste and achieving President Obama's goal of doubling energy productivity by 2030, relative to 2010 levels.

2020

To continue the success of the President’s Better Buildings Challenge, the Administration will continue to expand Better Buildings Accelerators to support and encourage adoption of state and local policies to cut energy waste and save consumers and families money.

2030

The Administration will build on its progress and continue to establish impactful energy conservation standards for appliances that — when combined with the progress already underway from the first term — will reduce carbon pollution by at least 3 billion metric tons by 2030, equivalent to more than a year's carbon pollution from our entire electricity system.

Reducing other greenhouse gas emissions

Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are among the fastest-growing greenhouse gases. Methane, another potent greenhouse gas, accounted for nearly 10% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2012.

 

PROGRESS:

In September 2014, the White House announced new private-sector commitments and executive actions to decrease HFC emissions, reducing the equivalent of 700 million metric tons of carbon emissions globally through 2025.

 

PROGRESS:

The Administration has partnered with farmers to cut emissions and increase carbon sequestration in the agricultural and forestry sectors through voluntary and incentive-based measures.

Continuing the momentum for the future:

The United States must lead through international diplomacy and domestic actions to reduce emissions and transition to safer and more substantial options.

2020

The Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Agriculture, Energy, Interior, Labor, and Transportation will implement a comprehensive, interagency methane strategy.

The EPA will also use its authority under the Clean Air Act to encourage private sector investment in low-emissions technology by identifying and approving climate-friendly chemicals while prohibiting certain uses of more harmful HFCs.

Moving Forward

When it comes to the oil and gas sector, investments to build and upgrade gas pipelines will not only put more Americans to work, but also reduce emissions and enhance economic productivity.

The Obama Administration will work collaboratively with state governments, as well as the private sector, to reduce emissions across multiple sectors, improve air quality, and achieve public health and economic benefits.

Federal leadership

 

Since 2008, federal agencies have reduced greenhouse gas pollution by more than 17 percent — the equivalent of permanently taking 1.8 million cars off the road — and set an aggressive new goal of reducing federal emissions by 40 percent by 2025.

 

PROGRESS:

Expanded energy performance contracts from $2 billion to $4 billion to provide energy efficiency upgrades for Federal buildings, at no net cost to the taxpayer.

 

PROGRESS:

In December 2013, President Obama signed a Presidential Memorandum directing the federal government to buy at least 20% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020.

Continuing the momentum for the future:

President Obama believes that the federal government must be a leader in clean energy and energy efficiency.

2020

The federal government will consume 20 percent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020 — more than double the current goal of 7.5 percent.

 

The President committed to reduce the federal government’s direct greenhouse gas emissions by 28 percent below 2008 levels by 2020.

Even as we take new steps to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, we must also prepare for the impacts of a changing climate that are already being felt across the country.

https://www.whitehouse.gov/climate-change